Shiny Linkiness

SNB logo tinyThe sixth issue of Shiny New Books came out last Thursday. As always it’s packed full of goodies from the latest bestsellers to hidden gems that need more publicity.This issue, I only reviewed three books, two non-fiction and one fiction, so I shall indulgently point you in their direction here. Please do click through to see the full reviews (and I hope once there you’ll find more to interest you).

I Saw a Man by Owen Sheers

i saw a manYou may remember that earlier this year I had a bit of a fangirl moment with the handsome Welshman at the Faber Fiction Showcase. It was finally time to read the book, (carefully given my unique inscription from him) and I really enjoyed it. The story of three men and how bereavement and grief affects their lives, it has a thriller-ish feel to the plot, but has a style that owes much to Sheers’ poetic side.

Read the full review here.

Instrumental by James Rhodes

instrumental james rhodes A memoir of ‘music, medication and madness’, this is not for the faint-hearted, and had me in tears regularly all the way through. Classical pianist Rhodes was terribly abused as a child and this book spares no punches in telling us what happened and the consequences that still affect his life today. However, it’s not all bad, for Rhodes has a mission to interest younger generations in classical music and its power to transcend the horrors of life; it saved his. Powerful and shocking, yet hopeful too.

Read the full review here.

Spirals in Time by Helen Scales/

Spirals-in-Time-small-440x704 I love to read popular science books, but rarely venture into the natural world. To find a book that is so much more than just a biological survey of a particular animal group was a joy, for Helen Scales’s book on seashells also explores their place in culture and mythology, and she has some amazing stories to tell there – from their use as currency to the Victorian collectors and the harvesting of the elusive ‘sea-silk’. These all run alongside the marine biology of the shell-forming molluscs. Told with wit and wonder, it’s fab.

Read the full review here.

Shiny New Books – Issue 6!

Lots of book reviews to come, but today I have to plug the new issue of Shiny New Books which has just been published.

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As always you’ll find an eclectic mix of bestsellers and undiscovered gems from around the world of books within its pages. Please do go and take a look. I’ve been so busy that I’ve only contributed three reviews this time (although as the backroom engine, I did schedule over 70 of the 75 pages!) – I’ll tell you about them another day.

Huge thanks to all our contributors, publishers who supplied review copies, and especially my wonderful co-editors: Victoria, Harriet and Simon.

I’m off for my breakfast now – but I will leave you with the cover star of the new issue’s fiction section – Harry, guarding books on the stairs.

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Weekend Miscellany

It’s been a busy week – but now I have half term – although nothing planned, as my daughter is revising and has her Duke Of Edinburgh Bronze expedition next weekend. I ought to start work on the summer edition of the school magazine, but it’s also a time for catching up with blogging. So here’s a miscellany of my bookish week:

Firstly, a huge thanks to Vintage Books (and Will Rycroft) for picking my name out of the hat to win their latest newsletter competition. It was all about writers who have worked for the New Yorker and their links to another author who was editor of the magazine for a long while. My prize was a set of Vintage classics by that editor – William (Keepers) Maxwell.

Maxwell

I must admit I’ve never read Maxwell, and before I looked him up to enter the competition I had never heard of him! He had a long life, being born in 1908, dying in 2000, and appears to have had an equally long writing career. Will tells me I’m in for a treat, and I’m looking forward to getting stuck in… But which to read first?

  • They Came Like Swallows (1937) is a family drama
  • All the Days and Nights (1965) is an anthology of short stories
  • The Folded Leaf (1945) is a coming of age tale set in 1920s Chicago
  • So Long, See You Tomorrow (1980) is about jealous farmers in rural Illinois
  • Time Will Darken It (1948) turn of the century Illinois
  • The Chateau (1961) An American couple holiday in France.

I’m drawn to The Chateau or The Folded Leaf, but do tell me if you’d particularly recommend any of the others.

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Secondly, it’s time for a little non-fiction Shiny Linkiness…

All I Know Now by Carrie Hope Fletcher

All I Know NowThis book is part memoir, part advice guide from the young star of Les Miserables who is also a Youtube vlogger and younger sister of Tom from McFly.

Aimed squarely at the teenaged girl market, I snaffled a proof copy to write a ‘Mum’s-eye review’ of it for Shiny New Books – it’s stuffed full of relentlessly cheerful good advice from an obviously lovely girl who wants to be your ‘honorary big sister’. Unlike Zoella and co, Carrie has only herself to plug, and she makes it clear that hard work is required, but tells it with a lot of good humour whilst trying to be a comfort too. If you have a younger teenaged daughter, buy it for her and get in her good books!

Click here to read my full review.

Naked at the Albert Hall by Tracey Thorn

naked at the albert hall Tracey Thorn is back with another book which allows her to explore in detail one area which didn’t fit in the first book, specifically the art of singing.

She serves us up an enticing mixture which includes snatches of memoir, interviews with other singers, singers in literature, the mechanics of singing, ruminations on what it means and its power. She also talks frankly about her stage fright, which has prevented her singing live now for many years.

As with her brilliant memoir Bedsit Disco Queen, this volume is shot through with wit and wonder; she writes beautifully and I really enjoyed reading in her company again.

Click here to read my full review.

Shiny New Books now has an affiliate link to The Book Depository, so if you want to find out more you can click through at the bottom of my full reviews. SNBks remains totally independent though, the affiliate account is just to help pay for the webhosting.

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mostly_booksThirdly, I was shocked to find out this week that the owners of my favourite bookshop – the amazing Mostly Books in Abingdon – have put the business on the market, so they can concentrate on their kids and other things. The good news is that they’re not in a particular hurry and are hoping to sell to the right kind of person.  Could I?….

Despite having no experience of proper retail or bookselling, I do have ideas, and have always had a dream of owning a bookshop. I can’t afford to buy it outright without downsizing my house, which I wasn’t planning to do until my daughter goes to university. But, if I had a business partner, that would give half the financial risk, double the ideas, the ability to have holidays and not necessarily work six or seven days a week. Anyone interested?

Extra Shiny Linkiness

SNB logo tinyThe mid-season Extra Shiny was published yesterday featuring twenty more pages of reviews and features; I have four amongst them. Today I shall feature the two new fiction reviews and also one from the main issue I didn’t introduce here – as always, follow the links to read the entire review:

Hotel Arcadia by Sunny Singh

hotel arcadiaSuch a glorious technicolor cover don’t you think? Gunmen takeover a luxury hotel, murdering as many guests and staff as they can find. We follow the siege through the eyes of Concierge Abhi, and Sam a guest and war reporter. Literally unputdownable! Exciting and moving – I loved it. (10/10)

To read the full review click here.

The Field of the Cloth of Gold by Magnus Mills

field cloth gold millsMen and their work – and this time – camping!  Mills’s new novel gives us his unique take on life – is it based on the historic event where Henry VIII met Francis I in a field not far from Calais, or is it more like the furthest campsite from a festival?  Even more dead-pan than usual and very funny underneath. (8.5/10)

To read the full review click here.

The Buried Giant by Kazuo Ishiguro

buried giantPlanning this post, I realised I hadn’t directed you to my review of Ishiguro’s latest novel which is rather appropriate, for the overarching theme of it is forgetting. I still ponder about some of this book’s meaning but I’m recalling it with fondness a couple of months after reading.  (8/10)

To read the full review click here.

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Sources: Publisher, Own copy, Publisher respectively. Thank you.
To explore further on Amazon UK, please click below (affiliate link):
Hotel Arcadia by Sunny Singh, Quartet Books, March 2015. Hardback, 232 pages.
The Field of the Cloth of Gold by Magnus Mills, Bloomsbury, April 2015. Hardback, 224 pages.
The Buried Giant by Kazuo Ishiguro, Faber & Faber, March 2015. Hardback, 352 pages.

Shiny Debuts – Love and Linkiness…

Today’s batch of Shiny linkiness from my reviews in issue 5 of Shiny New Books features three debut novels. All absolute crackers! Please click through to read the full reviews and join in the comments:

Etta and Otto and Russell and James by Emma Hooper

eorj This is a quirky quest novel, wherein 80-year-old Etta decides to walk to the sea – 2000 miles from Saskatchewan to the Atlantic Ocean. She leaves behind two men who love her, husband Otto and neighbour Russell, and we’ll find out all about the three of them as her journey goes on. And no, it’s not the Canadian Harold Fry – it’s totally different.

This novel was a quirky yet understated pleasure to read – I loved it.

Click here to read my full review (and see a clip of Emma talking about her grandparents who inspired the book).

Fire Flowers by Ben Byrne

Fire Flowers Europa Editions’ first British novel is a story of lost siblings and romance set in Tokyo following the prolonged firestorm that moreorless destroyed the city, and starts on the day of the Japanese surrender at the end of WWII.

The story is told by four characters. Satsuko Takara and her younger brother Hiroshi have been orphaned and separated by the firestorm. Satsuko will never give up looking for her teenaged brother, whereas he assumes she is probably dead. Then there is Hal Lynch – an American who used to be an aerial photographer, now a photo journalist for the US press in Tokyo. Lastly we follow Osamu Maruki, a writer and Satsuko’s lover before he was sent to the South Pacific. The four have separate lives in the ruined city, and they will cross paths although not necessarily meeting.

Fire Flowers is the first novel I’ve read set during this time and place. It was a gripping historical story, heart-breaking and heart-warming in equal measure. A remarkable debut – I loved it too.

Click here to read my full review

Our Endless Numbered Days by Claire Fuller

fuller I’ll put my cards on the table – as of today, this is still the best book I have read so far this year!

It tells of a girl Peggy, daughter of Ute, a German concert pianist and James – a survivalist. In 1976, James takes little Peggy off to live in a hut in the woods in the Black Forest, telling her the rest of the world has gone. Nine years later she is back, naturally damaged by her experience. We tease out the story of what happened in the book’s present and in flashback. It is full of fairy-tale resonance, very dark, sometimes humorous, but always full of music. Absolutely fantastic!

Click here to read my full review.

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Source: Publishers – thank you all!

To explore further on Amazon UK, please click below (affiliate link):

 

Non-fic Shiny Linkiness

Yes, there’s more Shiny Linkiness today. One of the things I do love about reviewing for Shiny New Books is that it introduces me to some great non-fiction which I don’t read enough of, and the latest issue is no exception. Please feel free to comment here, or even better – follow the links to the full reviews and comment there.  Thank you!

Birth of a Theorem by Cédric Villani

birth-of-a-theorem-198x300I realise that a memoir about winning the Fields Medal for mathematics will not be to everyone’s taste – especially as it contains pages of equations… BUT – they are just illustrations, treat them sections from a musical score and pass them by whilst appreciating the complexity you’ve just skimmed over and it does make some kind of sense to see them on the page.

Cédric Villani is a flamboyant Frenchman who likes flashy clothes and music and brings his recent career to life so we can understand a bit about what mathematicians really do!

I was rather excited by this book and you can read my full review here.

The Knowledge by Lewis Dartnell

the-knowledgeI was able to kill two birds with one stone with this book. We discussed it this month at our book group – I didn’t choose it, but was very glad to have read it, and as the new issue of Shiny New Books coincided with its paperback release, I could review it there and then discuss with the group.

This book is a thought experiment about rebooting civilisation’s lost science and technology following a world-disaster like a flu-pandemic. It’s a primer that’ll give you the basics – or point you in the right direction largely through re-examining how we discovered key processes the first time around in history. You’ll really get to appreciate how important being able to make soap and lime are after the end of the ‘grace period.’

Our book group found this fascinating and dry in equal measure. Although it is a science book written by a scientist, the others would have liked some more social science and comment incorporated – but it ‘does what it says on the tin’ and I enjoyed it a lot.

Read my full review here.

The Year of Reading Dangerously by Andy Miller

andy miller book Lastly, again, to coincide with publication of the paperback, I revised my review of Andy Miller’s book which I originally posted about here. I may have had problems with one tiny section, but I did really enjoy reading this book.

Read my revised Shiny review here.

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Source: Top – publisher – thank you. Middle and bottom – own copies.
To explore further on Amazon UK, please click below (affiliate links):

Birth of a Theorem: A Mathematical Adventure by Cédric Villani (trans Malcolm De Bevoise), Bodley Head, March 2015, hardback, 260 pages.
The Knowledge: How To Rebuild Our World After An Apocalypse by Lewis Dartnell, Vintage paperback, March 2015, 352 pages.
The Year of Reading Dangerously: How Fifty Great Books Saved My Life by Andy Miller, 4th Estate paperback, April 2015, 253 pages.

 

More Shiny Linkiness

Time for some more links to reviews I wrote for the latest edition of Shiny New Books. Please do click through and read the full things if these teasers interest you. Feel free to comment here or there. Today’s choices are YA titles:

Half Wild by Sally Green

half wildHalf Wild is the middle book in a trilogy which started with Half Bad last year (my blog review here.)  The first volume was rather unfairly described by some as Harry Potter for teenagers, as the story is about witches – black and white, good and bad. The tricky bit is to identify which lot are the good ones and which are the bad – and it’s not always the way round that you’d think. Stuck in the middle is Nathan Byrne, a young lad of mixed parentage, having a black witch father and white mother. He ends up on the run searching for his father who has to give him his three gifts and blood on his seventeenth birthday to fully fledge him as a witch.

In Half Wild, Nathan is still on the run from the white witch hunters, and the novel becomes a thriller – a classic chase across Europe, not made better by the object of Nathan’s affections being a white witch, Annalise. It is pacy and definitely more grown up than the first novel and huge fun.

Read my full review here.

The Door That Led to Where by Sally Gardner

door that led to whereSally Gardner is one of my favourite YA authors – her light touch with magic and soaring imagination make all her books a treat.
This, her latest, is all about a teenaged boy discovering his ancestral heritage. AJ, a failure at school apart from an A* GCSE English, gets a job as a ‘baby clerk’ in the law firm that his mum used to clean for. There he discovers a key with his name on, and it opens a door – a time portal into Dickensian London. It turns out that lots of other people want control of the key and AJ and his friends will have some interesting adventures in both worlds before deciding ‘when’ they want to be…

This book is a well-plotted adventure that has a lot to say about friendship. It was surprisingly gritty too, so not for the youngest of teens perhaps.

Read my full review here.

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Source: Own copy and publisher respectively
To explore further on Amazon UK, please click below:

Some Shiny linkiness

Time for a few links to my reviews at Shiny New Books.  Feel free to comment here or there.

I shall start off today with a crowd pleaser!

Ross Poldark by Winston Graham

ross-poldark-978144728152801What a good excuse to be able to post pics of Aidan Turner and Robin Ellis as new and old TV Poldarks (along with their respective Demelzas of course)!

I welcomed being able to re-read the first novel in Graham’s popular series, (and am now getting stuck in to Demelza, the second). OK, my review is less about the book, and more about comparing and contrasting it with the TV series – but, I enjoyed reading again the beginning of the story I loved so much as a teenager when I devoured the books first time around.

The good news is that the BBC will definitely make a second series!

Meanwhile here’s the link to my full piece: click here.

To accompany the book/TV review, I also compiled an entry in Shiny’s Five Fascinating Facts series about Winston Graham: click here.

Interview with Jane Thynne

War-of-Flowers-final-front_480x_acf_croppedI am, as you may already know, a big fan of Jane Thynne’s Clara Vine novels – the latest of which, A War of Flowers, I reviewed here.

So it was a pleasure to be able to interview her again, this time for Shiny New Books. We talked about the series, some of its themes, her research and all those characters from real life inside the Third Reich in the late 1930s as well as the conversations around the dinner table – her husband, Philip Kerr, also writes spy novels set in 1930s Germany!

This series gets better and better with each addition – I can’t wait for the fourth novel.

For the full interview: click here.

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Source: Own copy and publisher respectively.
To explore further on Amazon UK, (affiliate link), please click below:

Shiny New Books is 1 today!

SNB logo tinyIt was a year ago today that my dear friends Victoria, Harriet and Simon and I dipped our toes into the waters of publishing an online book review magazine.
Four issues, three inbetweenies and over 500 pages of content later – we’ve reached issue five of Shiny New Books and can almost call ourselves established! It’s been a fun year and the four of us work together well – Thank you all.

SNB logo tiny Our main aim was to find great books to recommend and to match these tomes with the best book-bloggers to write about them, and to accompany the reviews with a wide range of supporting material. Our list of contributors has grown with us to encompass new friends from all over the place and the scope of the titles we include has broadened too, although quality fiction remains the backbone of the mag.

SNB logo tinyI’d like to thank everyone who has written for us so far – you are all amazing, but especially our regulars and our new behind the scenes helper Bookgazing!  Also thank you to all the publishers who have sent books far and wide to our reviewers. 

SNB logo tinyNow we are a bit wiser about what works and what doesn’t, we hope to continue making our quarterly main editions of Shiny New Books better and better. Our inbetweenie issues are being re-christened ‘Extra Shiny’ and the next one will be on May 12th.  I’m putting that date out now because one of our new features is the Shiny Book Club. We’ve announced the book chosen today, and we’ll congregate to discuss from that date in our ‘Extra Shiny’.

SNB logo tinyOther plans?  Well it would be nice to make the magazine pay for itself – although it doesn’t cost a fortune to run, there are costs which we’ve paid for.  We could offer affiliate links to certain online stores, but are a bit wary of that undermining our independence.  We could offer space for advertisements on the sidebars, but that might clutter up our look! Any suggestions are welcome.

SNB logo tinyAlso, we’re always searching for new reviewers – email us at info@shinynewbooks.co.uk  In particular, we’d like to feature a few more SFF titles and we’ve not reviewed poetry properly yet, so if either of those genres are your thing, get in touch, or just get in touch anyway.

SNB logo tinyI’ll be highlighting my own reviews at Shiny (9 + 2 BookBuzz features!) over the next couple of weeks, but don’t let that stop you from popping over for a look – do sign-up for the newsletter and we welcome comments – just in case you’ve forgotten, you need to click HERE.

 

Happy Birthday Shiny.

Here’s to Issue 5 and beyond!