Shiny Linkiness

SNB logo tinyThe sixth issue of Shiny New Books came out last Thursday. As always it’s packed full of goodies from the latest bestsellers to hidden gems that need more publicity.This issue, I only reviewed three books, two non-fiction and one fiction, so I shall indulgently point you in their direction here. Please do click through to see the full reviews (and I hope once there you’ll find more to interest you).

I Saw a Man by Owen Sheers

i saw a manYou may remember that earlier this year I had a bit of a fangirl moment with the handsome Welshman at the Faber Fiction Showcase. It was finally time to read the book, (carefully given my unique inscription from him) and I really enjoyed it. The story of three men and how bereavement and grief affects their lives, it has a thriller-ish feel to the plot, but has a style that owes much to Sheers’ poetic side.

Read the full review here.

Instrumental by James Rhodes

instrumental james rhodes A memoir of ‘music, medication and madness’, this is not for the faint-hearted, and had me in tears regularly all the way through. Classical pianist Rhodes was terribly abused as a child and this book spares no punches in telling us what happened and the consequences that still affect his life today. However, it’s not all bad, for Rhodes has a mission to interest younger generations in classical music and its power to transcend the horrors of life; it saved his. Powerful and shocking, yet hopeful too.

Read the full review here.

Spirals in Time by Helen Scales/

Spirals-in-Time-small-440x704 I love to read popular science books, but rarely venture into the natural world. To find a book that is so much more than just a biological survey of a particular animal group was a joy, for Helen Scales’s book on seashells also explores their place in culture and mythology, and she has some amazing stories to tell there – from their use as currency to the Victorian collectors and the harvesting of the elusive ‘sea-silk’. These all run alongside the marine biology of the shell-forming molluscs. Told with wit and wonder, it’s fab.

Read the full review here.

Advertisements

5 thoughts on “Shiny Linkiness

  1. It’s a sign of Shiny’s success in attracting such a great team of reviewers that we ed.s don’t need to write so many reviews ourselves. Anyway, these are great reviews — quality counts more than quantity!

  2. Great selection, Annabel. The Sheers is already on my list, handsome, or not! I saw James Rhodes’ interview on C4 News recently when the battle to get the book published against his ex-wife’s wishes was mentioned. I think I’ll be adding that one, too.

Comments are closed.